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Macromedia bangalored

“Millions use our software. A chosen few develop it.” That is the head tagline that I saw on the Macromedia India website. I had remained totally silent about the Macromedia Development center at Bangalore, India because none at Macromedia mentioned that officially. But now I think everything is official and open. If you are looking for job opportunities, head over the site and apply for the same.

I remember that phone call (an excerpt);

Lady: Do you want to work for a company which is your dream company?
Me: May I know the name of the Company?

Lady: I am sorry, but it is a big MNC and is your dream company!
Me: Well, you have to give me an extremely good reason, I rejected IBM’s offer recently. Are you from the same Recruiting Agency?

Lady: No.
Me: How did you get my number?

Lady: We have databases of developers, and I also registered recently at IndiaMMUG and I saw your name there too.
Me: Ok

Lady: The company have setup a new office in Bangalore and they are looking for talented developers, many have applied.
Me: (with the recent buzz about Macromedia, India, I was feeling the air of the same) Is this about Macromedia?

Lady: YES
Me: Had it been 2 years ago, I would have jump in right away. I am flattered but I am sorry.

  1. Hi, thanks for the consideration, but it hasn't been a secret... there have been engineering teams in India for a good while, hired for specific projects, but it is only this past year that the company has actually worked on opening its own office there. I remember this being discussed in some of the previous quarterly presentations, although I don't remember which one at the moment:
    http://www.macromedia.com/macromedia/ir/macr/quarterly_results/

    Some of the Bangalore staffers are indeed in San Francisco this month... tomorrow I think we're taking a field trip to Berkeley, should be fun.

    Something I've been wanting to ask you... how are technical discussions handled in Mumbai? Is it Hindi or English, or does Marathi have sway in day-to-day work? How about if you worked in Bangalore, would Kannada be the day-to-day communication tool, or would people be from enough different regions that Hindi or English would be used?

    tx, jd/mm

  2. Hi, thanks for the consideration, but it hasn't been a secret... there have been engineering teams in India for a good while, hired for specific projects, but it is only this past year that the company has actually worked on opening its own office there. I remember this being discussed in some of the previous quarterly presentations, although I don't remember which one at the moment:
    http://www.macromedia.com/macromedia/ir/macr/quarterly_results/

    Some of the Bangalore staffers are indeed in San Francisco this month... tomorrow I think we're taking a field trip to Berkeley, should be fun.

    Something I've been wanting to ask you... how are technical discussions handled in Mumbai? Is it Hindi or English, or does Marathi have sway in day-to-day work? How about if you worked in Bangalore, would Kannada be the day-to-day communication tool, or would people be from enough different regions that Hindi or English would be used?

    tx, jd/mm

  3. > Something I've been wanting to ask you...
    > how are technical discussions handled in Mumbai?
    > Is it Hindi or English, or does Marathi have sway in day-to-day work?
    > How about if you worked in Bangalore,
    > would Kannada be the day-to-day communication tool,
    > or would people be from enough different regions that Hindi or English would be used?

    It is not just technical discussion but almost everything is handled in English, it is the de-facto unifying language for the diverse people here. As for technical discussions, it is indeed just english. Marathi is spoken only by a handful of the original inhabitants of Mumbai but that is reducing too among the new generations when the cultutral separation is becoming thinner and thinner. The best part is that even the cab drivers knows English to the point where they can communicate the destinations, show places and talk off their fares very well.

    I think it is pretty similar with the scenario in Bangalore.

    English is infact the un-official national language in India. If you know English, you won't have problem in India at all (know a bit of Hindi, if you want to do lotta intricate grocery shopping). And even in most middle class families in Mumbai, people converse in English for day-to-day household conversation. I think it would be the same in many metropolies like Delhi, Bangalore, Kolkatta, Chennai and many other prominent places.

    Personally, neither hindi nor marathi is my language, learnt to speak hindi not long ago. But English saved me in each and every situation.

  4. > Something I've been wanting to ask you...
    > how are technical discussions handled in Mumbai?
    > Is it Hindi or English, or does Marathi have sway in day-to-day work?
    > How about if you worked in Bangalore,
    > would Kannada be the day-to-day communication tool,
    > or would people be from enough different regions that Hindi or English would be used?

    It is not just technical discussion but almost everything is handled in English, it is the de-facto unifying language for the diverse people here. As for technical discussions, it is indeed just english. Marathi is spoken only by a handful of the original inhabitants of Mumbai but that is reducing too among the new generations when the cultutral separation is becoming thinner and thinner. The best part is that even the cab drivers knows English to the point where they can communicate the destinations, show places and talk off their fares very well.

    I think it is pretty similar with the scenario in Bangalore.

    English is infact the un-official national language in India. If you know English, you won't have problem in India at all (know a bit of Hindi, if you want to do lotta intricate grocery shopping). And even in most middle class families in Mumbai, people converse in English for day-to-day household conversation. I think it would be the same in many metropolies like Delhi, Bangalore, Kolkatta, Chennai and many other prominent places.

    Personally, neither hindi nor marathi is my language, learnt to speak hindi not long ago. But English saved me in each and every situation.

  5. Cool, thanks B... I've been studying Hindi, but had been surprised in China at how little Mandarin I heard in Shanghai and the south, so I started wondering just how widely Hindi and English were actually used in India. Maybe one of the differences is the amount of geographic mobility people have, to move from city to city...?

  6. Cool, thanks B... I've been studying Hindi, but had been surprised in China at how little Mandarin I heard in Shanghai and the south, so I started wondering just how widely Hindi and English were actually used in India. Maybe one of the differences is the amount of geographic mobility people have, to move from city to city...?

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