Congress creates (another) superfluous Task Force to examine possible Government Spectrum Auction

After being told so repeatedly, the U.S House of Representatives thinks they might not be using their wireless spectrum block to its full potential, so like any good bureaucracy — they formed a task force. They assuredly hope it will be more effective than pretty much every other task force the government has ever made, or maybe not. The U.S congress is aiming to free-up government-owned spectrum for airwave-hogging 3G and 4G consumer networks and appliances as wireless spectrum availability becomes a strong issue in the country as available spectrum wanes despite less than half the population having upgraded to high-speed 3G and 4G networks.

This bipartisan task force, dubbed the Federal Spectrum Working Group, hopes to trim the fat from their spectrum use to help solve a good chunk of the spectrum crunch. The U.S government is currently the largest owner of wireless spectrum. The FSWG will focus on freeing-up airwaves, especially on spectrum-hogging departments like the Defense Department, who uses a large bulk of government spectrum in surveillance and, surprisingly, weapons testing.

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National Defense Authorization Act 2012 gives Americans a taste of their own Medicine

The initial cloud of smoke has cleared on 2012’s National Defense Authorization Act and we are still no better informed about the extent of its newly formed ambiguous power than we were when it was passed two weeks ago.

The NDAA of 2012 broke with its traditionally monotonous roots when its scope spread far beyond the traditional yearly Department of Defense budgeting. In a seemingly dodgy move the government slipped in the now highly controversial Section 1021 and 1022—constitution-raping pieces of legislation akin the Patriot Act on steroids. The two sly sections allow for the indefinite detention of American citizens suspected of terror activities, without a trial. Think: Guantanamo Bay tactics for Americans, on US soil.

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