National Defense Authorization Act 2012 gives Americans a taste of their own Medicine

The initial cloud of smoke has cleared on 2012’s National Defense Authorization Act and we are still no better informed about the extent of its newly formed ambiguous power than we were when it was passed two weeks ago.

The NDAA of 2012 broke with its traditionally monotonous roots when its scope spread far beyond the traditional yearly Department of Defense budgeting. In a seemingly dodgy move the government slipped in the now highly controversial Section 1021 and 1022—constitution-raping pieces of legislation akin the Patriot Act on steroids. The two sly sections allow for the indefinite detention of American citizens suspected of terror activities, without a trial. Think: Guantanamo Bay tactics for Americans, on US soil.

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